Thermostat Replacement, Car Overheating

Category: Auto Tuning

 Thermostat replacement is generally done if a car is overheating. The other possibility is that the car is no longer heating up correctly due to the thermostat sticking. Before changing the thermostat verify that the engine coolant is full and that the cooling fan is working when the car is up to temperature. You will also need to find out the recommended temperature of your car’s thermostat when you purchase it. This sunbird has a 3.1 liter v6 engine that will randomly overheat. Another possibility is that the water pump is bad. Removing the radiator cap (if possible) when it is cool, can some times be helpful to see if flow is occurring although it won’t always work.

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Car won’t go, it shakes

Category: Auto Tuning

grand am engine

 If a car shakes when the gas petal is stepped on and it won’t go fast, then you probably have an ignition problem. This is generally a problem caused by a spark plug wire arcing to the engine ground. The other possibility can be a bad spark plug. This is a 1996 pontiac grand am, 2.4 liter engine with a coil pack. This means that there are no spark plug wires but instead an intermediate plug that fits between the plug and the coil. If a car stumbles when the gas petal is stepped on it is because the spark is grounding to the engine instead of reaching the spark plug. If your car has not had a tune up lately now would be a good time to do that. To find the problem first the spark plugs need to be removed.

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Ignition timing

Category: Auto Tuning


Setting the timing on a vehicle is a simple task. First you must know what the manufacturer’s spec is for the stock timing. This information is usually under the vehicle’s hood. Many vehicles have their ignition timing set somewhere between 6 and 12 degrees advanced. Advanced ignition means that the spark that occurs in the cylinder happens earlier before the piston reaches top dead center. After you know what the timing spec needs to be you will need a timing light. Connect the timing light up to the battery or power source that it uses first. Next connect the clamp over the number one spark plug wire, which obviously runs to the #1 cylinder. This should also be marked on your distributor. If your distributor has a vacuum line running to it, remove the vacuum line and plug it so that it doesn’t suck in air. If this line is not plugged, the timing reading can be incorrect as the timing may be advanced slightly. The next thing you will need to do will be to locate the timing mark usually high-lighted yellow on the end of the engine or dampener.

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